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Archive for the ‘Library Loot’ Category

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin – a classic case of a hold coming in and me having no memory whatsoever of ordering the book.  I guess the good thing about long hold lines at the library is they can make books first anticipated months ago feel like new discoveries!  Now that I’ve reminded myself of what this one is about, I’m intrigued to try it.

Brewster’s Millions by George Barr McCutcheon – I am in fact still working on my Century of Books (this means a glut of reviews are coming…one day) and this comic classic from 1902 will help fill one of the difficult early years.  I’ve heard about it before, this tale of a man who must spend a million dollar inheritance in one year in order to receive an even larger one, and it sounds like a good, fun summer read.

Kaukasis by Olia Hercules – I have been reading a lot of cookbooks focused on Georgia lately (Tasting Georgia, in particular, is marvellous) so I’m looking forward to Hercules’ take on the region.  My issue thus far has not been finding inspiration but in finding people who will let me actually cook the recipes for them.  Maybe I just need to stop giving them a choice…

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

The Promised Land by Pierre Berton – I picked this up with plans to read it over the Canada Day long weekend but was so busy I didn’t end up getting to crack it – or any other book.  But Berton’s books are always worth reading and I’m very much looking forward to this history of the mass wave of pre-WWI immigration to western Canada.

Two Steps Forward by Graeme Simsion and Anne Buist – I will pick up any book about walking – fiction or non-fiction – but this novel about two strangers walking the Camino de Santiago from France is just not catching me.  I’ll give it a bit longer but don’t expect great things.

Act Like It by Lucy Parker – this caught my eye when Danielle mentioned it a few weeks ago and I had as much fun reading it as she did.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Welcome Home by Stuart McLean – Oh, Stuart McLean.  I miss you so.  McLean was a Canadian journalist and broadcaster whose early career was spent traveling the country and doing slice-of-life interviews with the people he met.  This is a collection of his pieces from that period, focused on small towns.

The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore by Kim Fu – I heard about this thanks to NPR. It feels like summer here this week so a book about summer camp seems just right.

Achtung Baby by Sara Zaske – I am so desperate for any books about Germany – especially outsider’s perspectives of Germany – that I have resorted to reading parenting books.  Despite having no children.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Fascism by Madeleine Albright – so, so excited to read this “examination of Fascism in the twentieth century and how its legacy shapes today’s world.”  Albright’s perspective is shaped by both her professional experiences as an American politician and diplomat, and her personal experiences of growing up in exile after her homeland was overrun by fascists (which you can read more about in Prague Winter).

Tasting Georgia by Carla Capalbo – cookbooks about the Caucasus seem to be popular right now and I am not complaining.

The Visitors by Mary McMinnies – Barb’s enthusiasm for this had me placing a library hold even before I finished reading her review.  

The Year of Living Danishly by Helen Russell – more happy Nordic people!  I do have to say, everyone I know who has moved to Denmark is remarkably delighted to be there so there must be something to it.

The Road to Lichfield by Penelope Lively – Always eager to read more by Lively.

Sophia of Silicon Valley by Anna Yen – spotted this while killing a lunch hour in the bookstore attached to my office building (I know, dangerous) and was intrigued by the premise – a woman’s perspective of the boys club atmosphere of Silicon Valley – but not enough to buy it.  Library to the rescue!

What did you pick up this week?

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Every Frenchman Has One by Olivia de Havilland – Memoirs by American expats who move to Paris are always popular – you just don’t expect them to also be written by famous movie stars.  Originally published in the early 1960s, this was reissued in 2016 in celebration of de Havilland’s 100th birthday so is readily available.

The Italian Teacher by Tom Rachman – I adored Rachman’s first book, The Imperfectionists, about the staff of an English-language newspaper in Rome, and also loved his second, The Rise and Fall of Great Powers.  Now he’s back with a new novel focused on a man trying to make peace with his famous father’s legacy.

The Times Great Letters – the internet is good for many things but it is bad for those of us who like nothing better than over-educated people writing letters to newspaper editors.  Or, best of all, people who carry on complicated feuds via the newspaper’s letters to the editor section.  To see us through this new, dark age there is this new-ish collection of notable letters from the last 100 years.  And, thank god, the always reliable letters to the editor section of The Economist.

A garden-themed trio!

Natural Selection by Dan Pearson – a selection of gardening articles Pearson wrote over ten years for The Observer.  Also, inexplicably, the heaviest book I have held in quite some time.

Rhapsody in Green by Charlotte Mendelson – this is the gazillionth time I’ve borrowed this BUT I am actually reading it for the first time (go me!!!!).  And it’s wonderful.  Mendelson’s pieces on life as a passionate, vegetable-obsessed, urban gardener are just right for me this week (as I struggle with my own small city garden and vegetable seeds).

Orchard House by Tara Austen Weaver – a memoir of a mother and daughter rebuilding their relationship while reviving an abandoned garden in Seattle.

Life without a Recipe by Diana Abu-Jaber – I loved Abu-Jaber’s food-focused memoir of her childhood, The Language of Baklava, last year (it almost made my best books of 2017 list) and am looking forward to this sequel, which continues her story into adulthood.

End of the Rope by Jan Redford – a memoir from a local author earning comparisons to Wild, about climbing mountains and finding herself.

Hiddensee by Gregory Maguire – It’s been a long time since I read any of Maguire’s books but, feeling in the mood for something fairy tale-inspired (and still months away from the release of the last book in Katherine Arden’s Russian fairy tale-inspired trilogy) I’ve picked up this tale based on the Nutcracker.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

It turns out I was a little precipitous in my last Loot post when I optimistically declared that my non-reading days were over.  They were not.  I have managed to read a grand total of 0 of those books.  All I can say in my defense is that sunshine is very distracting.  Also, I have discovered The West Wing Weekly podcast, which is allowing me to obsess over the my-all-time-favourite TV show while enjoying walks in the sunshine.  It’s the definition of a win-win.  Unless you are a neglected book.

Undaunted, I have brought home more books to keep the neglected ones company.

The Odyssey translated by Emily Wilson – Groundbreaking.  Radical.  Contemporary.  These are the kind of words being used to describe Wilson’s recent translation.  Shockingly, this is the first (published) English-language translation of The Odyssey by a woman.  And isn’t that a bleak thought.

The Ivory Door by A.A. Milne – more Milne for A Century of Books.

North by Brontë Aurell – continuing the publishing obsession with all things Scandinavian, this is much, much funnier than I expected from it’s hipster-aesthetic design while also managing to provide lots of fascinating info.

Honey for Tea by Elizabeth Cadell – a little something soft and undemanding.  This sounds like classic Cadell.

Green Money by D.E. Stevenson – okay, this is the one book I have managed to read lately – and one of the few D.E. Stevenson titles I had not read before.

The Tourist Guide by Jaroslav Hašek – Short stories from the author of The Good Soldier Švejk.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

People!  How are you?  I went a full week without reading even a single page of a book and it was very, very weird.  This is what happens when a) you are learning a new job, b) you are sick, c) the weather finally turns nice after months of rain, and d) you combine a+b+c.  But my cold is gone, I’m settled at work, and we have so much sunshine in the forecast that I shall quickly learn to take it for granted.  Bring on the books!

The Scribe of Siena by Melodie Winawer – one of the highlights of my new job is its proximity to a huge bookstore.  On rainy days (of which there have been many this year) I can duck in there and read during my lunch break.  It was on one of those rainy days that I came across this novel about a time-travelling neurosurgeon.  The start was promising and my love of Siena was enough to convince me that I wanted to keep reading (just not enough to buy it – thank you library!).

Zinky Boys by Svetlana Alexievich – Alexievich’s extraordinary oral history of Soviet women’s experiences during WWII (The Unwomanly Face of War) will undoubtedly make it onto my Best of 2018 list.  But it’s also inspired me to try more of her work, like this oral history of the war in Afghanistan.

The English Wife by Lauren Willig – I’ve enjoyed some of Willig’s books in the past so automatically placed a hold on this when I heard it was coming out.  But now that it’s here I’m a bit worried it’s too gothic for me (to be fair, my tolerance for all things gothic is extraordinarily low).  We shall see!

Summer Hours at the Robbers Library by Sue Halpern – did I know anything about this book when I placed a hold on it?  Nope.  Marketing departments take note: all I require in order to be intrigued by a book is the mention of a library.  That’s how easy it is.  Now that I’ve actually learned what the book is about, I’m even more intrigued.

Dancing Bears by Witold Szabłowski – NPR had an interesting interview with Szabłowski that got me interested in this account of people struggling to adjust to life after communism.

Emma Ever After by Brigid Coady – ever the optimist, I will always try anything Austen-related.  Particularly, as in this case, when it’s a modern retelling of Emma.  My favourite Austen book is the hardest to retell so my expectations are low.

Istanbul & Beyond by Robyn Eckhardt – a beautifully photographed collection of recipes from across Turkey.

Curries and Bugles by Jennifer Brennan – I read about this in More Home Cooking by Laurie Colwin back in 2016 and, with my love of all things Raj-related, have been trying to find a copy ever since. Thanks to the inter-library loan system, I’ve finally got my hands on it.

Queen Bees by Siân Evans – to meet my never-sated appetite for inter-war gossip, I picked up this profile of six London society hostesses.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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