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Archive for the ‘Library Loot’ Category

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

After many happy years, Linda has decided to cut back on the amount of time she spends blogging and so will no longer be co-hosting Library Loot.  She’s been a wonderful co-host and I will miss her!

What her departure does offer is an opportunity for another blogger to get involved with Library Loot.  I am looking for a new co-host so if you’re interested let me know!  Leave a comment or send me an email (check out my contact information).   All you need is a love of your library and a blog!

Until there is a new co-host, I’ll be continuing to share my loot every two weeks.  If you want to share weekly, you can use the most recent post to share your link (or, you know, volunteer to co-host.  Just an idea).

Yorkshire by Richard Morris – I love the very un-English bragging in this subtitle: a lyrical history of England’s Greatest County.  It also happens to be where much of my father’s family is from, so I’m biased enough to agree.

The Perfect Alibi by A.A. Milne – more Milne!

The Roy Strong Diaries: 1967-1987 – I think this marks the point where I give up any idea of finishing ACOB in one year.  I am simply drawn to too many very, very long books.  I’ve been looking forward to reading Strong’s diaries ever since I first encountered him back in 2012 (when I read The Laskett and A Country Year, adoring them both) and plan to savour every page.

Home and Garden by Gertrude Jekyll – I was inspired to pick this up (though it’s long been on my to-read list) after Penelope Lively mentioned it in her marvellous A Life in the Garden

Love Among the Chickens by P.G. Wodehouse – I’m not expecting much from this very early Wodehouse but, completist that I am, I’m intrigued.

Martini Henry by Sara Crowe – Crowe’s first novel, Campari for Breakfast, was absolutely delightful and completely earned its comparisons with Love, Nina and I Capture the Castle.  I can’t wait to catch up with Sue and Aunt Coral in this sequel.

The Greek Escape  by Karen Swan – This doesn’t sound like something I’d usually try but it’s dark and starting to get cold here so anything that can aid in sunny travel dreams has some appeal.

The Secret of Platform 13 by Eva Ibbotson – A secret doorway into a magical world at King’s Cross station?  Eva Ibbotson beat J.K. Rowling to that idea with this children’s book from 1994.  I read Ibbotson’s adult novels (now rebranded as YA) throughout my teens but am only discovering her children’s books now and am loving them.

What did you pick up this week?

And, more importantly, would you be interested in co-hosting Library Loot? 

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Lots of inter-library loans for me this week, including:

Bond Street Story by Norman Collins – I’ve known for years that I would enjoy Collins’ work and the reality is just as good as promised.  I am in the middle of this story of a London department store and its staff and enjoying every page.

Come Be My Guest by Elizabeth Cadell – Cadell is embarrassingly undemanding on her readers but I enjoy her light tales with their sun-soaked settings.

The Sun in Scorpio by Margery Sharp – I’ve read a few Margery Sharp books this year and loved them all (The Flowering Thorn, Four Gardens, and Something Light, which I’ve not yet reviewed).  This sounds like it will be just as good, based on Sharp expert Barb’s review.  

Life in the Garden by Penelope Lively – One of the last books off my 2017 “The Ones That Got Away” list, I am so excited to read this part memoir-part exploration of literary gardens by one of my favourite authors.

Three Plays by A.A. Milne –  What three you may ask?  The Dover Road, The Truth About Blayds, and The Great Broxopp.  I’ve read (and loved) one and am looking forward to the other two to fill years for A Century of Books.

Bella Figura by Kamin Mohammadi – A typical – and very enjoyable – memoir about swapping a stress-filled life in London for good living in Italy.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

I am back!  You want to know who is in no doubt as to my return?  My local library branch.  I went in and picked up the shelf full of holds that were waiting for me, no doubt to their great relief.  I’m feeling slightly overwhelmed but in the best possible way.

The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton – I’ve been looking forward to this since Rachel raved about it in the spring.

Kings of the Wyld by Nicholas Eames

No Picnic on Mount Kenya by Felice Benuzzi

The Sea Queen by Linnea Hartsuyker

Holidays in Heck by P.J. O’Rourke

This is Going to Hurt by Adam Kay

The Bucket List by Georgia Clark

The Good Luck Charm by Helena Hunting

The Shortest Way Home by Miriam Parker

The Hollow of Fear by Sherry Thomas – the third in Thomas’ “Lady Sherlock” series

All Things Consoled by Elizabeth Hay

Hiking with Nietzsche by John Kaag

Turvey by Earle Birney – a quick arrival!  I placed a hold on this after reading Barb’s review over the weekend.

The Little Book of Lykke by Meik Wiking

Vox by Christina Dalcher

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Vacation time!  And for me, that means two weeks in Europe with a heavily loaded e-reader.  I’ve got lots of choices this year to keep me busy when I’m not off hiking or sightseeing.

Women Talking by Miriam Toews

The Railway Children by E. Nesbit

Save the Date by Morgan Matson

Machine Without Horses by Helen Humphreys

The Late Bloomers’ Club by Louise Miller

Friends and Lovers by Helen MacInnes

Don’t Make Me Pull Over! by Richard Ratay

The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers

Footsteps in the Dark by Georgette Heyer

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

The Debatable Land by Graham Robb – I find borderlands fascinating and there is one border in particular that is always fashionable to write about: the one between Scotland and England.  I’m intrigued by this much-praised book (it sounds wonderful) but I’m interested to see how it compares to Rory Stewart’s The Marches, which I adored.  This sounds very similar and Stewart set a very high standard to live up to.

Land of the Dawn-Lit Mountains by Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent – On the other end of the spectrum, we have the rarely written about region of Arunachal Pradesh.  This sounds like the perfect sort of travel book, about somewhere truly foreign to anywhere I’ve been or experienced for myself.  And, it must be said, I’m delighted to see that it’s by a female traveller.  Travel writing of the adventurous sort is all too often an all-male domain.

Weekend at Thrackley by Alan Melville – I’m not a mystery reader by nature but I keep seeing others talk about the British Library Crime Classics series and I am nothing if not suggestible.  The intro discusses Melville’s love of A.A. Milne (is this perhaps why he, christened William Melville Caverhill, included Alan in his pen name?) and the similarities of this country house mystery with Milne’s The Red House Mystery.  After that, I how could I resist?

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Auntie’s War by Edward Stourton – I have so been looking forward to this history of the BBC during WWII (it’s one of the last books I have unread from the 2017 releases I wanted to read).  Some of Stourton’s more judgmental statements in the introduction have made me a little wary but I hope these will be set aside as the book progresses.

Northland by Porter Fox – I am a big fan of travel writing and am intrigued by this tale of Fox’s three-year journey along the Canada-US border.  However, like Auntie’s War, I am finding it hard to get into as Fox spends the opening pages mythologizing the obscure and wild “Northland”.  Dude, there are thirty-six million Canadians living above you, mostly clinging to that very border.  Stop make it sounding like a wild frontier.

The Race to Save the Romanovs by Helen Rappaport – Yay, a new book from Rappaport, this time about the doomed efforts to save the Romanov family.

Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik – I am very, very excited to have Novik’s newest book in my hands.  Like  Uprooted (a wonderful book), Spinning Silver is set in Eastern Europe, inspired by fairy tales (in this case, Rumpelstiltskin), and promises to be a wonderful read.

Alone Time by Stephanie Rosenbloom – as a solo traveler, I am always excited to hear about other people’s experiences travelling on their own and all the reasons they love to do so.  In this slim volume, Rosenbloom describes her solo travel experiences in four different cities – Paris, Istanbul, Florence, and New York.  I read this quickly on the weekend (while travelling solo, in fact) and quite enjoyed it.  It made me think of all the places I’d love to visit on my own that I haven’t been to yet and all the places I’d love to return to.  It also reminded me of how much I love Paris, hate Florence, and would love to visit Istanbul.

My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan – I must have seen this on a summer reading list somewhere from someone I trusted because otherwise why on earth would I have placed a hold?  It sounds fluffy and light, perfect for the upcoming long weekend.  Also, I will try just about anything set in Oxford (really – I once wasted a few hours of my life reading Surprised by Oxford, a book full of evangelical cant and horrible dialogue but full of scenic bits about Oxford).

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

A Lost Lady by Willa Cather – It’s been a while since I read anything by Cather – in fact, the only thing I’ve read by her since I started this blog is The Song of the Lark.  But I loved her as a teenager and am excited to return to her with this slim novel.

Citizens of London by Lynne Olson – Wartime London is one of my favourite topics and has been ever since I was twelve and first read The Siren Years.  But I’ve never read anything focused on the Americans who were there, frustrated by their nation’s neutrality and eager to help their host country in its fight.  I’ve so enjoyed the other books I’ve read by Olson (most recently, Last Hope Island – one of my favourite books of 2017) so have every expectation of loving this, too.

Clock Dance by Anne Tyler – This is Tyler’s first new release since I discovered her a year or so ago, when I had great fun reading Vinegar Girl, her retelling of The Taming of the Shrew, and was completely absorbed by A Spool of Blue Thread.  So, naturally enthusiastic, I placed a hold as soon as my library order it.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

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