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Archive for the ‘Library Loot’ Category

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Forty Autumns by Nina Willner – I’m already halfway through this fascinating memoir about Willner’s maternal family, separated for decades after her mother fled East Germany in the 1940s. (Book Depository)

Love from Boy edited by Donald Sturrock – I’ve borrowed this collection of Roald Dahl’s letters to his mother before without ever reading them but I’m in the mood for letters and hoping this will hit the spot. (Book Depository)

Mountain Lines by Jonathan Arlan – A walking memoir (which I’d somehow missed on its release back in 2017) about walking the GR5 from Lake Geneva to Nice. (Book Depository)

Funny in Farsi by Firoozeh Dumas –  My love of expat memoirs continues with this story of a woman who moved to America from Iran as a child and whose cultural identity was further confused when she married a Frenchman.  (Book Depository)

Unsheltered by Barbara Kingsolver – This novel about the fragility of American middle class lives is scary and upsetting and sadly realistic.  (Book Depository)

In Search of Nice Americans by Geoff Steward – I’d not heard of this before but saw it on a display and am trusting Tony Hawks’ (author of the very funny Round Ireland with a Fridge) words of praise: “Geoff Steward has written a brilliant debut travelogue and I’m sure there will be more. It’s charming, engaging and, above all, really funny.”  (Book Depository)


Finally, when not reading I’m having my own mini Ingrid Bergman festival, featuring Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words, a fascinating documentary about Bergman made with her own home movies, Spellbound with Gregory Peck, and the always delightful Indiscreet with Cary Grant.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Belonging by Nora Krug – a visual memoir of Krug’s quest to make peace with her country’s history – and her own German identity – by learning more about her family’s history.

I Am, I Am, I Am by Maggie O’Farrell – I’ve loved many of O’Farrell’s novels and am very intrigued by this memoir about her bizarrely numerous near-death experiences.

Imogen by Jilly Cooper – I’m an erratic listener when it comes to the Backlisted podcast (I find the hosts irritating but the books and guests interesting) but I did catch the recent episode on Imogen by Jilly Cooper. It sounded light and silly and, having breezed through it as soon as the hold came through, I can confirm it is both those things (in a pleasant enough way).

What did you pick up this week?

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

The glorious spring has turned to winter here.  There is snow everywhere and I hate every single flake of it.  But, on the plus side, there are plenty of books to keep me entertained when I am not fixating on how much I hate snow.

Something Wonderful by Todd S. Purdum – A thoroughly entertaining look at the partnership of Rodgers and Hammerstein.  I adore musicals so sped through this as soon as I picked it up.

A Month in the Country by J.L. Carr – A classic I’ve yet to read.

The Lost Art of Keeping Secrets by Eva Rice – I recently discovered the very wonderful Sentimental Garbage podcast, the first episode of which is devoted to this novel.  My own copy is in storage so, desperate to reread it, I turned to the library.

What did you pick up this week?

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Sharlene has the Mr. Linky this week.

Two VERY exciting books for me this week:

The Fated Sky by Mary Robinette Kowal – When I picked up The Calculating Stars last week, I wasn’t sure how it would go given my mixed feelings towards Kowal’s previous books.  By the time I was a third of the way through it, I was hooked and racing to place a library hold on this sequel.  Kowal has created such a fascinating world, with the exploration of space completely reimagined in the wake of a meteorite hit in the early 1950s that speeds up global warming and forces humankind to look for ways to colonize space as the planet becomes uninhabitable. I am so excited to read more.  (Book Depository)

The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden – IT’S HERE!!!  Originally scheduled to be released last August, I feel like I’ve been waiting ages and ages for this final book in Arden’s Winternight trilogy.  The first book, The Bear and the Nightingale, was one of my favourite reads of 2017 and I sped through the second book, The Girl in the Tower, early last year.  I can’t wait to see how Arden concludes the series. (Book Depository)

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Leap In by Alexandra Heminsley – I wrote about this swimming memoir over the weekend but to sum it up: I couldn’t put it down.  Highly recommended. (Book Depository)

Darling Ma edited by James Roose-Evans – Do I know much about Joyce Grenfell?  No.  Do I need to in order to enjoy these letters she wrote to her mother?  We’ll find out.

The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal – An alternate history with a decidedly feminist twist from the always intriguing Kowal. (Book Depository)

Buttercups and Daisies by Compton Mackenzie – Simon really enjoyed this last year, which is reason enough for me to try it!

(Not Quite) Mastering the Art of French Living by Mark Greenside – With my May trip to Brittany booked, I’m eager to read all I can to get myself in the mood.  However, there is a lamentable lack of travel or expat memoirs about the region.  Thankfully, Greenside, an American who has been living part-time in Brittany for decades, published a new memoir last year. (Book Depository)

A Question of Honor by Lynne Olson and Stanley Cloud – I was in the mood for really well written popular history and few people do it as well as Lynne Olson (here writing with husband Stanley Cloud).  This fascinating book focuses on the story of the Kosciuszko Squadron, Polish pilots who played a vital role in WWII.  And, since I can never recommend it enough, a reminder that you must read Olson’s Last Hope Island, about the contributions made by occupied countries to the war effort. (Book Depository)

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

In my last Library Loot post, I mentioned I had just read (and adored) Love Walked In by Marisa de los Santos.  Audrey then got my year off to a spectacular start by alerting me to the fact that there were not one but two sequels: Belong to Me and I’ll Be Your Blue Sky.  What joy!  Naturally I got my hands on them within a few days and have read them both already with great delight.

In contrast, I’ve known about Hearts and Minds by Jane Robinson since it was first announced, long before its publication early last year, but have had to wait ages for my library to get a copy.  I am really looking forward to this history of the Great Pilgrimage of 1913, when suffragists (not suffragettes, importantly) marched from across the UK towards London to raise awareness of the fight for women’s suffrage.

I’ve borrowed Fascism by Madeleine Albright before but it has been in great demand and I wasn’t able to finish it before the due date.  I’m excited to return to this “examination of Fascism in the twentieth century and how its legacy shapes today’s world.”  Albright’s perspective is shaped by both her professional experiences as an American politician and diplomat, and her personal experiences of growing up in exile after her homeland was overrun by fascists (which you can read more about in Prague Winter).

I was browsing the food writing section of the bookstore by my office and noticed Unprocessed by Megan Kimble.  I’m always intrigued by experiments and find Kimble’s one – to eat only whole, unprocessed foods for a year while living on a student budget – particularly intriguing.

Finally, it’s been two years since I first borrowed War Diaries, 1939-1945 by Astrid Lindgren.  I didn’t manage to read them that time but I remain intrigued and eager to know more about what life in neutral Sweden was like during the war.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you). 

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Nothing like starting the year off with lots of new books to read (and, as you can see from my loot, travels to plan)!

Love Walked In by Marisa de los Santos – this was the last book I read in 2018 (bringing me to a round 150) and it was such a lovely way to end the year.  The story of Clare (age eleven) and Cornelia (age thirty-one) and how they find each other (and the other things they’ve been missing) was warm, charming, and full of golden-age movie references – what’s not to love?

Daughters of the Winter Queen by Nancy Goldstone – I placed a hold on this back when the library first ordered it but am even more excited now to read the story of Elizabeth Stuart, the Winter Queen, and her four daughters.  Why?  Because I reread A Desperate Fortune by Susanna Kearsley last month, which focuses on the Jacobite community living in exile on the continent, so am in the perfect mood for more Stuart history.  I love when the timing works out that perfectly.

The Maisky Diaries edited by Gabriel Gorodetsky – I borrowed this before but never managed to get around to it.  Still, there was no doubt I would return to it – I love diplomat’s diaries, especially from this period (see my all-consuming love of The Siren Years by Charles Ritchie).

Love to Everyone (or The Skylark’s War) by Hilary McKay – I can’t remember where I first saw children’s story set during WWI reviewed but it was enough to convince me to place a hold.  I’ve seen it numerous places since then (the hold list moved very slowly) and it seems to be universally loved.

Matchmaking for Beginners by Maddie Dawson – I have an extraordinary weakness for stories about matchmakers.

The Precious Ones by Marisa de los Santos – I loved Love Walked In so much that I grabbed this off the shelf without even looking to see what it’s about.

All my other reading is suffering since my spare time is currently devoted to obsessively reading about France.  I’m planning to visit Europe in late May/early June this year and have been fretting over where to go.  London is a given but I was completely at sea as to where to spend the rest of my time – too many places appealed to me!  But I think I’ve settled on Brittany, with its beautiful coastline and thousands of kilometers of walking paths.  Now I’m having fun pining down the details.

What did you pick up this week?  

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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