Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Library Loot’ Category

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

My library is slowly starting to reopen.  They’re hoping to have most branches open with some level of service by September but until then are offering some creative options.

Phase One of reopening saw them piloting a take out service.  Here’s how it worked: patrons completed a short survey online (or by phone) to indicate the type of books they liked. This was very high level (do you like: fiction? fiction – fantasy?  fiction – mystery?  memoirs and biographies?  non-fiction?)  and had only a limited ability for patrons to provide more detailed information about their tastes.  You then indicated how many books you wanted (up to a maximum of 10) and the library would put together a selection of titles for you to pick up.  Only 5 branches (of the usual 21) were open and offering this service and they quickly filled their capacity, closing it after more than 800 people signed up almost immediately.  Luckily, I was one of the 800.

I was a bit skeptical about how this would work.   Given how much I read and how limited the survey was, how likely was it that the library staff would be able to select books that would interest me and which I hadn’t already read?  In the survey, I noted that I was interested in gardening books (narrative rather than how to), travel memoirs, nature writing, and history books focused on Europe and the Middle East.

Honestly, I’m pretty impressed with their selections, not a single one of which I’ve read so far.  But I’m still very excited for the library to move on to Phase Two of their reopening plan later this month, when they’ll open five more branches (including my local one) and start allowing people to pick up holds.  We’re still waiting for further details on this (will you be allowed to place new holds?  will they be processing ones already in the system?  or will you just be able to pick up the ones that have been waiting on the shelves since the beginning of March?) but it is progress!

Here’s what the library gave me:

Yardwork by Daniel Coleman (Book Depository)

Mister Owita’s Guide to Gardening by Carol Wall (Book Depository)

The Secret Wisdom of Nature by Peter Wohleben (Book Depository)

Bullets and Opium by Liao Yiwu – I’m a little disappointed that the only history book they gave me is focused on modern China rather than the regions I am most interested in but I am intrigued (Book Depository)

I Might Regret This by Abbi Jacobson (Book Depository)


Curiosities and Splendour (Book Depository)

A Journey to the Dark Heart of Nameless Unspeakable Evil (also published as The Worst Date Ever) by Jane Bussman (Book Depository)

Ten Years a Nomad by Matthew Kepnes – this has been on my radar for a while so I was very excited to see it in my bag! (Book Depository)

The Amazing Story of the Man Who Cycled from India to Europe for Love by Per J. Andersson – another one I’ve had my eye on (Book Depository)

White Sands by Geoff Dyer (Book Depository)

What are you reading this week?

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Okay, the library e-holds have officially gotten out of hand.  I’m trying to impose order but in the last week I’ve had more than 20 of them become available.  Even I – and even off work, as I am this week – cannot keep up with that kind of volume.  Bless the Overdrive feature that allows you to delay holds!

Here are the ones I did check out:

Why We Swim by Bonnie Tsui (Book Depository)

Love, Unscripted by Owen Nicholls (Book Depository)

The Other Bennet Sister by Janice Hadlow (Book Depository)

Always the Last to Know by Kristin Higgins (Book Depository)

Fire Logic by Laurie J. Marks (Book Depository)

In Praise of Paths by Torbjørn Ekelund (Book Depository)

We Are Not Here to Be Bystanders by Linda Sarsour (Book Depository)

A Love Hate Thing by Whitney D. Grandison (Book Depository)

500 Miles From You by Jenny Colgan (Book Depository)

What are you reading this week?

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

What a week for books!  I had so many exciting e-holds come in all at once, several of them brand new releases.  I’ve got some holiday time coming up which, given our current circumstances, won’t be spent spectacularly but it will give me lots more time for reading all of these.

The Beauty of Your Face by Sahar Mustafah – Sharlene featured this in her Spring TBR post back in March and it immediately caught my eye.  (Book Depository)

Lady in Waiting by Anne Glenconner – This memoir from one of Princess Margaret’s ladies-in-waiting looks fun and light and altogether like the perfect distraction. (Book Depository)

I’d Give Anything by Marisa de los Santos – I only discovered Marisa de los Santos last year but, after falling in love immediately with Love Walked In, I quickly read all of her adult books and adored them.  I can’t wait to read this new release. (Book Depository)

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel – Like everyone in the world, I loved Station Eleven so have been looking forward to seeing what Mandel would do next.  This sounds far more mystery/thriller-like than my usual fare but that should make it perfect for vacation reading. (Book Depository)

Star-Crossed by Minnie Darke – I will usually run in the opposite direction of anything featuring astrology (which is apparently now cool?  Am I oblivious to yet another key hipster millenial experience?) but this romcom sounds cute and the first chapter is definitely promising.  I’m counting on it to balance out The Glass Hotel (Book Depository)

Real Men Knit by Kwana Jackson – I saw this in NPR’s May round-up and thought it sounded cute (Book Depository)

This is Happiness by Niall Williams – The FT review of this last autumn was so enthusiastic that I immediately placed a hold.  And then I had to jump into an entirely new hold queue for the e-book but such is life right now. (Book Depository)

Humankind by Rutger Bregman –  This was just published on Tuesday so I’m delighted to have my hands on it already.  Bregman’s thesis is that people are essentially good, which is a hopeful message that I’m more than willing to accept – especially this week.  For bonus reading, the FT had an interesting lunch interview with him in the weekend edition.  (Book Depository)

Leave Only Footprints by Conor Knighton – With limited horizons, I’m even more on the lookout for travel memoirs than usual and this chronicle of Knighton’s visits to every American national park looks ideal for me.  (Book Depository)

What are you reading this week?

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

I have discovered the only thing more frustrating that the library being closed: the library being closed when it is allowed to be open.  We are slowly figuring out what the “new normal” looks like here and as of this week a number of things are allow to reopen albeit in very new forms, including libraries.  My library system is (slowly, wisely, frustratingly) taking its time to figure out how to do this.  We know they’re planning to offer a takeout model at select branches but neither the timeline nor the branches have been announced yet so for now it’s status quo.  But there is the promise of new books at some point in the nearish future!  For now, I’m still checking out lots of ebook and working my way through the stack of physical books I borrowed at the beginning of March.

Redhead by the Side of the Road by Anne Tyler – I wasn’t going to miss Tyler’s new release!  (Book Depository)

Man at the Helm by Nina Stibbe – In my whirlwind March stock up, I grabbed Reasons to Be Cheerful by Stibbe without realising it was the third in a series.  Very happy now to have gotten my hands on the first book. (Book Depository)

Thorn by Intisar Khannani – I spotted this on a list of Ramadan reading recommendations on Twitter and finding out it was a retelling of the Goose Girl fairy tale cinched it for me.  I cannot resist anything based on fairy tales.  (Book Depository)

I’ve been spending a LOT of time out walking (even more than my usual ridiculous amount) and while morning birdsong is lovely, mid-day crow sounds are not so I’ve been drowning them out with audiobooks.  Right now I’m listening to Children of Earth and Sky by Guy Gavriel Kay, which you may recall I adored when I read it a few years ago.

What are you reading this week?

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

My library e-holds are coming in shockingly fast these days.  I feel like I check my hold position, discovered I’m tenth in line and the anticipated wait is 17 weeks, and the next morning I get a notification that the book is available.  It’s been delightful in many cases but a bit of a challenge to manage.  I am adoring the new feature that allows me to postpone a book when it becomes available without losing my position in the queue.  It’s a genius innovation by Overdrive and is making my borrowing life far less stressful.

Here’s what’s arrived this week:

Missed Translations by Sopan Deb (Book Depository)

The Secrets We Kept by Lara Prescott (Book Depository)

Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler (Book Depository)

Uncanny Valley by Anna Wiener (Book Depository)

The Jetsetters by Amanda Eyre Ward (Book Depository)

Oona Out of Order by Margarita Montimore (Book Depository)

What are you reading this week?

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

I’ve been spending as much time as possible outside lately.  Whenever I’ve not been working, I’ve been walking in the woods by my house, strolling under the cherry trees in my neighbourhood, or working in the garden.  It’s been wonderful but hasn’t left much time for reading.

Unsurprisingly, when I do sit down to read I’m feeling drawn to books about nature to match the rest of my leisure activities.  There are three garden-focused books I’m keen to track down (Rootbound, The Five Minute Garden, and Where the Hornbeam Grows) and, with no library reopening in sight, have acted uncharacteristically and ordered a couple of them.  Needs must!

In my massive pre-lockdown library sweep, I did manage to pick up a couple of things that suit my current mood.  Here they are:

Hidden Nature by Alys Fowler (Book Depository)

The Wild Places by Robert Macfarlane (Book Depository)

My Natural History by Liz Primeau (Book Depository)

What are you reading this week?

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

It is finally time to start sharing some of the things I stocked up on before the libraries closed.  Today, I present you with my foreign DVD collection, encompassing 7 different languages: Turkish, French, German, Italian, Russian, Czech, and Arabic.  Of the five French films, I’ve seen four of them before and Brunetti is an old friend (and the source of much German vocab never covered in my university courses) but the rest are new to me.

What did you check out online this week?  Or what old treats are you holding on to from before the libraries closed?

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Well, two weeks makes quite a difference, doesn’t it?  My city library closed a week and a half ago but luckily I was prepared and had been stocking up for self-isolation already:

Image

I’m anticipating these measures will last for months rather than weeks so, in the interests of having something to post about in the future, will hold off talking about my physical loot for a while. For now I thought I’d show you some of the e-books that have come in recently:

My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell – If you’ve seen a “most anticipated books of 2020” list, no doubt this was on it.  I’m certainly intrigued. (Book Depository)

Death in Captivity by Michael Gilbert –  I’m not a big fan of crime or mystery books so have read very little from the British Library Crime Classics series but the Northern Italian setting has me intrigued for this tale.  (Book Depository)

Cutting Back by Leslie Buck – Since my travel plans for this year are being curtailed (my May trip to Czech Republic has been cancelled, no surprise.  Not terribly hopeful for my October trip to Spain at this stage either) I am resigning myself to 2020 as my year of armchair travelling.  To balance out my usually euro-centric focus, I’ve picked up this memoir from a woman who moved to Kyoto to learn the Japanese art of pruning. (Book Depository)

Something to Live For by Richard Roper – Now seems like the right time for an uplifting book about a lonely man finally learning to make connections.  An ironic time, but still the right time. (Book Depository)

If Morning Ever Comes by Anne Tyler – I recently sent a list of book recommendations to a friend and included a different Anne Tyler title on it, which reminded me of how good she is and how many of her books I have left to read. (Book Depository)

In Five Years by Rebecca Serle – Serle’s trademark seems to be “clever” book concepts.  She had a hit with The Dinner List (which conceptually was interesting but in execution was too boring for me to finish) and continues in her newest release with a woman who wakes up five years in the future, when her life is completely different than expected.  After an hour, she wakes up back in the present time.  But what did that glimpse of the future mean for her?  (Book Depository)

What did you pick up this week?  Or check out?  Could you even physically check things out where you live (if you were not practicing responsible social distancing)?

 

 

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Oh friends, the world feels like it’s changing day by day right now, doesn’t it?  But don’t worry: I am prepared.  Last night I dropped by the library to return a couple of things.  But then I started thinking about what would happen if the libraries were to be closed.  Without any notice.  When I had just returned things.  What kind of a fool am I?  This of course drove me into a panic so I did the only sensible thing: I dashed around in the 10 minutes before the library closed and grabbed 7 books just to be safe.  I haven’t included them below but I believe there are a couple of Dorothy Sayers, a history of the Ukraine, and at least one travel book.  I’m supposed to be leaving for the Czech Republic in early May but travel books may have to substitute for real travel this spring the way things are going.

The Authenticity Project by Clare Pooley – I was number one in the queue for this much hyped novel and, no surprise, read it immediately after picking it up over the weekend.  I love stories about people sharing their insecurities and building a community together, so this was perfect for me.  I plan to write more about it soon. (Book Depository)

The Importance of Being Aisling by Emer McLysaght and Sarah Breen – Oh the unfairness of life!  The first Aisling book came out back in 2017 and it was a breeze for me to buy on my e-reader while I was travelling in Europe.  It kept me laughing through a long and very bumpy travel day from Bologna to Krakow via Amsterdam that summer.  But I’ve been living in a wasteland since then as the sequels have been impossible to find in North America.  The interlibrary loan system has, as usual, come to the rescue and sourced me a copy from a small town deep in the Rocky Mountains.  (Book Depository)

A Castle in the Clouds by Kerstin Gier – Speaking of mountains, I read about this YA novel on NPR a while back and couldn’t resist the idea of a mystery set in an alpine hotel with an international array of guests and staff.  (Book Depository)

Letters from Russia by Astolphe de Custine – In 1839, the Marquis de Custine travelled through Russia and wrote these letters that were so insightful and damning that both Czarist and Communist regimes banned them in future years.  (Book Depository)

Yes No Maybe So by Becky Albertalli and Aisha Saeed – Another YA!  Who am I?  Someone who gets their book recommendations on Twitter, in this case (I think?) from YA author S.K. Ali (whose Love from A to Z I read at the end of last year and thoroughly enjoyed).  (Book Depository)


Hop, Skip, Go by John Rossant and Stephen Baker – An urban expert and a business journalist team up to look at the ways that the mobility revolution will change our lives (and has already). (Book Depository)

Born in the GDR by Hester Vaizey – A look at the lives of eight Germans who grew up in the GDR. (Book Depository)

Where Stands a Winged Sentry by Margaret Kennedy – I saw in the most recent newsletter from Handheld Press that they will be releasing this memoir from Kennedy of her experiences at the beginning of the Second World War in March 2021.  Rather than wait a full year, I turned instead to the library.  I’ve borrowed this a couple of time before but not ever got around to it – yet.

What did you pick up this week? Remember: books are the only acceptable thing to stockpile.  Leave the hand sanitizer and toilet paper at the store; head to your library instead when the hoarding mood strikes.

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

So many books and so little time to write about them!  I was off to see Roxane Gay speak last night so this is being written in a mad rush after that and will doubtlessly do disservice to most of the books, so let’s focus on the only one that matters:

Rhododendron Pie by Margery Sharp – Yes, I have tracked down a copy.  It’s the first time I’ve ever paid for an interlibrary loan but at only $15 came in far, far cheaper than any edition I’ve ever seen for sale (the cheapest one on AbeBooks right now is $280 in comparison).  Barb, always my guide to Margery Sharp, enthused about it years and years ago and I’m excited to finally get to try it for myself.

Now onto the rest:

At the Pond (Book Depository)

Poems New and Collected by Wisława Szymborska (Book Depository)

Solo by Signe Johansen (Book Depository)

Polaris Rising by Jessie Mihalik (Book Depository)

All for Nothing by Walter Kempowski (Book Depository)

My Beautiful Enemy by Sherry Thomas (Book Depository)

Aria by Nazanine Hozar (Book Depository)

The Blessed Girl by Angela Makholwa (Book Depository)

Pravda Ha Ha by Rory MacLean (Book Depository)

What did you pick up this week?

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »