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Archive for the ‘Library Loot’ Category

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

The Debatable Land by Graham Robb – I find borderlands fascinating and there is one border in particular that is always fashionable to write about: the one between Scotland and England.  I’m intrigued by this much-praised book (it sounds wonderful) but I’m interested to see how it compares to Rory Stewart’s The Marches, which I adored.  This sounds very similar and Stewart set a very high standard to live up to.

Land of the Dawn-Lit Mountains by Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent – On the other end of the spectrum, we have the rarely written about region of Arunachal Pradesh.  This sounds like the perfect sort of travel book, about somewhere truly foreign to anywhere I’ve been or experienced for myself.  And, it must be said, I’m delighted to see that it’s by a female traveller.  Travel writing of the adventurous sort is all too often an all-male domain.

Weekend at Thrackley by Alan Melville – I’m not a mystery reader by nature but I keep seeing others talk about the British Library Crime Classics series and I am nothing if not suggestible.  The intro discusses Melville’s love of A.A. Milne (is this perhaps why he, christened William Melville Caverhill, included Alan in his pen name?) and the similarities of this country house mystery with Milne’s The Red House Mystery.  After that, I how could I resist?

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Auntie’s War by Edward Stourton – I have so been looking forward to this history of the BBC during WWII (it’s one of the last books I have unread from the 2017 releases I wanted to read).  Some of Stourton’s more judgmental statements in the introduction have made me a little wary but I hope these will be set aside as the book progresses.

Northland by Porter Fox – I am a big fan of travel writing and am intrigued by this tale of Fox’s three-year journey along the Canada-US border.  However, like Auntie’s War, I am finding it hard to get into as Fox spends the opening pages mythologizing the obscure and wild “Northland”.  Dude, there are thirty-six million Canadians living above you, mostly clinging to that very border.  Stop make it sounding like a wild frontier.

The Race to Save the Romanovs by Helen Rappaport – Yay, a new book from Rappaport, this time about the doomed efforts to save the Romanov family.

Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik – I am very, very excited to have Novik’s newest book in my hands.  Like  Uprooted (a wonderful book), Spinning Silver is set in Eastern Europe, inspired by fairy tales (in this case, Rumpelstiltskin), and promises to be a wonderful read.

Alone Time by Stephanie Rosenbloom – as a solo traveler, I am always excited to hear about other people’s experiences travelling on their own and all the reasons they love to do so.  In this slim volume, Rosenbloom describes her solo travel experiences in four different cities – Paris, Istanbul, Florence, and New York.  I read this quickly on the weekend (while travelling solo, in fact) and quite enjoyed it.  It made me think of all the places I’d love to visit on my own that I haven’t been to yet and all the places I’d love to return to.  It also reminded me of how much I love Paris, hate Florence, and would love to visit Istanbul.

My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan – I must have seen this on a summer reading list somewhere from someone I trusted because otherwise why on earth would I have placed a hold?  It sounds fluffy and light, perfect for the upcoming long weekend.  Also, I will try just about anything set in Oxford (really – I once wasted a few hours of my life reading Surprised by Oxford, a book full of evangelical cant and horrible dialogue but full of scenic bits about Oxford).

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

A Lost Lady by Willa Cather – It’s been a while since I read anything by Cather – in fact, the only thing I’ve read by her since I started this blog is The Song of the Lark.  But I loved her as a teenager and am excited to return to her with this slim novel.

Citizens of London by Lynne Olson – Wartime London is one of my favourite topics and has been ever since I was twelve and first read The Siren Years.  But I’ve never read anything focused on the Americans who were there, frustrated by their nation’s neutrality and eager to help their host country in its fight.  I’ve so enjoyed the other books I’ve read by Olson (most recently, Last Hope Island – one of my favourite books of 2017) so have every expectation of loving this, too.

Clock Dance by Anne Tyler – This is Tyler’s first new release since I discovered her a year or so ago, when I had great fun reading Vinegar Girl, her retelling of The Taming of the Shrew, and was completely absorbed by A Spool of Blue Thread.  So, naturally enthusiastic, I placed a hold as soon as my library order it.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

A Circle of Quiet by Madeleine L’Engle –  This is the first of the Crosswicks Journals, a collection of four memoirs in which L’Engle’s muses about her writing, her faith, and her family.  My approach to the Journals has been typical: I started at the end, with Two-Part Invention.   It is the story of the last months of her husband’s life as cancer quickly takes over his body but it also the story of their forty year marriage.  It is devastatingly wonderful and one of the best books about marriage I have ever read. I then moved on to the second book, The Summer of the Great-Grandmother, and found much to love there, too, as L’Engle deals with her mother’s dementia-ridden final months and the realisation that she is now responsible for all the family memories.  A very high bar has been set and I’m interested to see how this compares.

The Long Spring by Laurence Rose – I can be a bit “meh” about nature writing but this is nature writing combined with travel writing so I’m keeping an open mind.

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje – I’m very excited about this new release from Ondaatje, especially since it seems to be concerned with memory, one of my favourite literary themes (hence my love of Penelope Lively’s works).

The Finnish Way by Katja Pantzar – I have worked my way through all the other Nordic country “how to be happy” books and now find myself learning about sisu, the Finnish cure-all.  Look, I don’t think it’s a surprise by now if I tell you the Nordic answer to eternal happiness is: Just Be Normal.  The end.  Still, a publishing trend hurts no one.

Eat Up! by Ruby Tandoh – I’ve only heard glowing praise for this food memoir from Tandoh, a Great British Bake Off finalist.  Having followed her columns for a while, I know she is a passionate and insightful writer and concerned with topics I find fascinating (like the ties between food and culture, or how nutrition and “virtue” have taken precedence over pleasure when it comes to fixing a meal).

My So-Called Bollywood Life by Nisha Sharma – why is YA diversifying so much faster than adult fiction?  This has been universally praised so I’m looking forward to it but I would be so much happier to read about adults.  Publishing industry, work harder!

Cookbook time!

Mamushka and Kaukasis by Olia Hercules – I’ve borrowed these before but have them out again and this time we’re actually cooking from them!  There have never been so many herbs in my house before – the lamb dish we made this weekend was loaded with parsley, cilantro, and dill, and was absolutely delicious.  Summer may not be the ideal time for all of these Ukrainian and Georgian/Azerbaijani dishes but we march on regardless.  I can’t wait to make all of the soups – but I have been waiting because even a soup fiend like myself knows it’s a horrible idea to spend hours with the stove on when its 30+ degrees outside.  But the heatwave here is set to end this weekend and my soup pot and I will be reunited – and unstoppable.

Made in India by Meera Sodha – I feel like I am cheating on Madhur Jaffrey but am quite enjoying these delicious and easy recipes.

And, since the library isn’t just for books, here are the DVDs I have out right now.  An Ideal Husband (Jeremy Northam with a mustache!) and The Winslow Boy (Jeremy Northam without a mustache!) are old favourites but the rest are new to me.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin – a classic case of a hold coming in and me having no memory whatsoever of ordering the book.  I guess the good thing about long hold lines at the library is they can make books first anticipated months ago feel like new discoveries!  Now that I’ve reminded myself of what this one is about, I’m intrigued to try it.

Brewster’s Millions by George Barr McCutcheon – I am in fact still working on my Century of Books (this means a glut of reviews are coming…one day) and this comic classic from 1902 will help fill one of the difficult early years.  I’ve heard about it before, this tale of a man who must spend a million dollar inheritance in one year in order to receive an even larger one, and it sounds like a good, fun summer read.

Kaukasis by Olia Hercules – I have been reading a lot of cookbooks focused on Georgia lately (Tasting Georgia, in particular, is marvellous) so I’m looking forward to Hercules’ take on the region.  My issue thus far has not been finding inspiration but in finding people who will let me actually cook the recipes for them.  Maybe I just need to stop giving them a choice…

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

The Promised Land by Pierre Berton – I picked this up with plans to read it over the Canada Day long weekend but was so busy I didn’t end up getting to crack it – or any other book.  But Berton’s books are always worth reading and I’m very much looking forward to this history of the mass wave of pre-WWI immigration to western Canada.

Two Steps Forward by Graeme Simsion and Anne Buist – I will pick up any book about walking – fiction or non-fiction – but this novel about two strangers walking the Camino de Santiago from France is just not catching me.  I’ll give it a bit longer but don’t expect great things.

Act Like It by Lucy Parker – this caught my eye when Danielle mentioned it a few weeks ago and I had as much fun reading it as she did.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Welcome Home by Stuart McLean – Oh, Stuart McLean.  I miss you so.  McLean was a Canadian journalist and broadcaster whose early career was spent traveling the country and doing slice-of-life interviews with the people he met.  This is a collection of his pieces from that period, focused on small towns.

The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore by Kim Fu – I heard about this thanks to NPR. It feels like summer here this week so a book about summer camp seems just right.

Achtung Baby by Sara Zaske – I am so desperate for any books about Germany – especially outsider’s perspectives of Germany – that I have resorted to reading parenting books.  Despite having no children.

What did you pick up this week?

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository, an online book retailer with free international shipping.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you).  

Read Full Post »

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