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Archive for the ‘Memes’ Category

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Princess Puck by Una L. Silberrard – the highlight of having Covid in June was having just the right book to hand: Desire by Una L. Silberrard.  I loved it and am intrigued to read more by Silberrard so tracked this down via ILL, despite having no idea what the story is about.  Time for a surprise!

The Giant’s House by Elizabeth McCracken – I mentioned in my last post that I had picked up a collection of McCracken’s short stories (The Souvenir Museum).  They were excellent and I’m now keen to read this, her debut novel from 1996 about a boy growing into the world’s tallest man and the librarian who falls in love with him.

Prague by Chad Bryant – I’m so intrigued by Bryant’s way of approaching Czech history here: “A poignant reflection on alienation and belonging, told through the lives of five remarkable people who struggled against nationalism and intolerance in one of Europe’s most stunning cities.”

A Blind Man Can See How Much I Love You by Amy Bloom – a collection of short stories recommended by Nancy Pearl.  

Lady Baltimore by Owen Wister – aside from reading Desire while I was sick in June, I also spent significant time combing through the archives of a couple of my favourite bloggers.  I came across Kate’s old review of this and was so intrigued I placed an ILL hold immediately.

The Exhibitionist by Charlotte Mendelson – a new novel from the always funny and observant Mendelson.  

What did you pick up this week?

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Some Body to Love by Alexandra Heminsley – I loved Leap In, Heminsley’s memoir about embracing swimming and IVF treatment, and have been looking forward to this further memoir about how her family changed when her husband announced he was transgendered and going to transition.

The Souvenir Museum by Elizabeth McCracken – Nancy Pearl is a great fan of McCracken and I chose to start with this collection of short stories.  I read it over the weekend and thought it was excellent.

The Beloved Girls by Harriet Evans – I used to love Evans’ light books but she is getting more and more gothic with every new one.  I picked this up reflexively when I saw it on the shelf and we’ll see how I get on with it.

The Beginner’s Goodbye by Anne Tyler – The best thing about Tyler is that she has such a huge backlist to work through!

Dear Reader by Cathy Rentzenbrink – always game for a bookish memoir.

Grounding by Lulah Ellender – a well-reviewed and unique-sounding gardening memoir.

What did you pick up this week?

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

It finally feels like proper summer has arrived here: things are slowing at work as people take vacations, the sun is shining not just once a week but every day, and it’s warm enough to laze in parks or the backyard morning, noon and night – with books, obviously.  Perfection.

The Rim of the Prairie by Bess Streeter Aldrich – this has been my year for discovering Bess Streeter Aldrich.  I’ve loved what I’ve read so far (A Lantern in Her Hand and A White Bird Flying) and look forward to reading more.

A Lady’s Guide to Fortune Hunting by Sophie Irwin – a newly released Regency romance about a young woman on the hunt for a rich husband to save her family.  This came out a few months ago in the UK and lots of my favourite fellow readers have had only good things to say about it.

A Year of Living Simply by Kate Humble – it’s always good to be reminded that it’s only the simple things that matter.

Alice, I Think by Susan Juby – Nancy Pearl is fan of this YA novel about fifteen-year-old Alice as she makes the transition from homeschooling to high school.  There’s usually a lengthy waitlist for this during the school year (it’s by a BC author so I assume it’s on school reading lists) but apparently teens become illiterate during the summer so I was able to grab it on a whim.

The Suitors by Cécile David-Weill – a French comedy of manners about two sisters on the hunt for a husband wealthy enough to purchase the family’s summer estate that means so much to both of them.

Fake It Till You Bake It by Jamie Wesley – a cupcake-baking football player, a reality tv star, and a fake dating ploy – clearly the stuff of summer reading.

What did you pick up this week?

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Sharlene has the Mr Linky this week.

Accent on April by Betty Cavanna and In a Mirror by Mary Stolz – two retro teen reads recommended in Nancy Pearl’s Book Crush.

My Place at the Table by Alexander Lobrano – I don’t officially participate in Paris in July but it strikes me this memoir by food writer Lobrano about his life there would be a perfect pick!  I started it as an e-book a few months ago but only just before it expired.  What I read then was excellent and I’m looking forward to getting back into it.

Legacy by Thomas Harding – Harding’s excellent history of his family’s one-time holiday home outside Berlin, The House by the Lake, looked at his father’s German branch of the family.  In Legacy, he turns his attention to his mother’s far more famous family, the Salmons and Glucksteins who started as tobacconists and then founded J. Lyons and Co, of the famous tea rooms, food brands, and hotels.  I read this in one day and found it absolutely fascinating.

Anna of Strathallan and No Roses in June by Essie Summers – more Summers!

What did you pick up this week?

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

I have this week off work so have stocked up on lots of interesting things to read, with my only goals for my vacation being to read, swim, walk, sleep, and repeat as often as possible.  Living the dream.

What did you pick up this week?

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Library Lust

credit: Inigo Real Estate Listing (via rightmove.co.uk)

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Nothing particularly bookish to report this week because, finally, inevitably, I have Covid.  After two years of heroic efforts, I have finally been brought low by my plague-ridden parents.  They are both now recovered and bouncing around in the world while I’m at home with a chest cough, fever, and several more days of isolation.  It’s not fun but neither is it awful, though I can only imagine how painful more severe strains would be or the experience of an unvaccinated and unboosted person.

Unable to leave the house, I’ve been postponing library holds and focusing on my own books with their comforting familiarity.  By this weekend I know I’ll be eager to get my hands on a fresh supply when I’m released back into the world but for now it’s nice to limit myself to only what is close at hand.

What did you pick up this week?

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Sharlene has the Mr Linky this week.

Flowers in the Rain by Rosamunde Pilcher – I mentioned in my April reading round-up my great discovery: while I hate pretty much every novel I’ve tried by Pilcher, I can tolerate and even enjoy her short stories.  I confirmed my earlier findings by reading this quickly and with pleasure over the weekend.

Sea of Tranquility by Emily St John Mandel – The publisher modestly describes this as “a novel of art, time, love, and plague that takes the reader from Vancouver Island in 1912 to a dark colony on the moon five hundred years later, unfurling a story of humanity across centuries and space.”  I thoroughly enjoy Mandel’s writing and am always delighted by the glimpses she includes of British Columbia, so am looking forward to this.

Remains to be Seen by Elizabeth Cadell – despite having gone on a Cadell binge a few years ago, there are still some titles I’ve never read, including this later novel.  It promises archaeology, a dash of mystery, and, of course, romance.

What did you pick up this week?

Read Full Post »

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

I had a weekend adventure only other library-lovers may be able to appreciate.  For the first time, I am using InterLINK, which allows patrons from linked public libraries to a) visit other library systems and use their usual card to borrow items and b) return the items to their home library.  The inter-library loans remain incredibly slow (1-3 months right now) so I can bypass that waiting period by hoping on the bus for – in this case – an hour, enjoying a wander through a new neighbourhood and lovely library, and getting what I want.  Even better, while ILLs are restricted to older items (nothing published this year or last) and books only, InterLINK allows you to borrow anything.  A few of my items below were picked up this way, along with lots of obscure foreign language DVDs.

I am doubtlessly going to go mad with this new power.

Memory Speaks by Julie Sedivy – Sedivy, a language scientist, explores the connections between language and memory from both a scientific and personal perspective.  Sedivy left Czechoslovakia and came to Canada as a small child, gradually losing most of her mother tongue but then reconnected with it as an adult.  I’m reading this right now and finding it so fascinating.

Overdue by Amanda Oliver – Based on Oliver’s experiences as a librarian in Washington, DC, this promises to “highlight the national problems that have existed in libraries since they were founded: racism, segregation, and class inequalities. These age-old problems have evolved into police violence, the opioid epidemic, rampant houselessness, and lack of mental health care nationwide—all of which come to a head in public library spaces.”

The Bay of Noon by Shirley Hazzard – I am working my way backwards through Hazzard.  Having started with The Great Fire (2003), I moved on to The Transit of Venus (1980), and now I’m back to 1970 with this novel about a young Englishwoman in Naples.

The Radical Potter by Tristram Hunt – Practically everything I know about Josiah Wedgwood has come at me sideways through books about Charles Darwin, his grandson.  Everything I’ve read about the man and his achievements has impressed me and I’m looking forward to learning more.  This was well-reviewed in the Guardian.

The Frequency of Us by Keith Stuart – In Second World War Bath, young, naïve wireless engineer Will meets Austrian refugee Elsa Klein: she is sophisticated, witty and worldly, and at last his life seems to make sense . . . until, soon after, the newly married couple’s home is bombed, and Will awakes from the wreckage to find himself alone.

No one has heard of Elsa Klein. They say he was never married.

Seventy years later, social worker Laura is battling her way out of depression and off medication. Her new case is a strange, isolated old man whose house hasn’t changed since the war. A man who insists his wife vanished many, many years before. Everyone thinks he’s suffering dementia. But Laura begins to suspect otherwise

Stepping Up by Sarah Turner – an utterly familiar plot – an irresponsible woman finds herself as guardian to her niece and nephew after a family tragedy – that is supposed to be well-done.

The Gran Tour by Ben Aitken – When Ben Aitken learnt that his gran had enjoyed a four-night holiday including four three-course dinners, four cooked breakfasts, four games of bingo, a pair of excursions, sixteen pints of lager and luxury return coach travel, all for a hundred pounds, he thought, that’s the life, and signed himself up. Six times over.

Windswept by Annabel Abbs – This was what prompted me to test the InterLINK system as my pleas for my library to buy its own copy have gone unheeded.  I am SO excited to start reading this memoir/group biography.

How We Met by Huma Qureshi – a short, gentle memoir about Qureshi’s experiences growing up in a family and culture that shaped her approach to finding a romantic partner – and how she eventually chose a different path and a very different sort of husband.

What did you pick up this week?

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Library Lust

Balcombe Street home – Inigo Estate Agency (via rightmove.co.uk)

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