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Archive for August, 2020

Library Lust

via AirBnB (home in Istanbul)

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

The days are getting shorter, the weather is getting cooler…autumn is definitely on its way.  Which, as all readers know, can only be a good thing as it means opportunities for curling up under blankets, reading by cosy lamplight, and generally embracing our default bookish behaviours.  I can’t wait!

The Switch by Beth O’Leary – Like everyone who enjoyed O’Leary debut (The Flatshare), I’ve been looking forward to her second book all about a grandmother and granddaughter who switch homes for a couple of months.  It was just released in North America last week and I was delighted to get my hands on it so quickly.  No surprise, I read it immediately. (Book Depository)

Writers & Lovers by Lily King – It is good for a book to be described as “a kind of gorgeous agony“?  I’ll find out.  (Book Depository)

My Year of Saying No by Maxine Morrey – 2020 has not been a year for keeping resolutions – keeping sane has taken priority.  But how fun to read about a normal world where that is possible.  (Book Depository)

Hamnet and Judith by Maggie O’Farrell – This needs no introduction, surely?  Intriguing, it’s published here as Hamnet and Judith but just Hamnet elsewhere.  (Book Depository)

Stalingrad by Vasily Grossman – Autumn calls for epics and what could be more epic than 1,000 pages about the Great Patriotic War? (Book Depository)

A New Kind of Country by Dorothy Gilman – Gilman, the author of the “Mrs Pollifax” series, bought a home in a small Nova Scotian fishing village after her sons left for university and “began her life again“.  The Mrs Pollifax books have never been quite my thing but this sounds just right for me.

Once Upon an Eid – So excited for this collection of stories for children from 15 different Muslim authors, including favourites S.K. Ali and G. Willow Wilson. (Book Depository)

Well-Behaved Indian Women by Saumya Dave – A family story about three-generations of women trying to figure out what they really want out of life. (Book Depository)

Destination Wedding by Diksha Basu – This looks like a fun light read about families, drama, and, of course, romance at a lavish Indian wedding. (Book Depository)

The Glass Hotel by Emily St. John Mandel – I borrowed this as an e-book a few months ago but just couldn’t get into it.  I’m happy to have my hands on the hardcover edition now for a “proper” reading experience. (Book Depository)

The Unquiet Dead by Ausma Zehanat Khan – It’s extraordinarily unusual for me to read a crime novel but this was on so many “Best of” lists back when it was originally published that I’ve been keeping an eye out for it ever since.  (Book Depository)

Down to Earth by Monty Don – Calming gardening advice to dip in and out of (Book Depository)

What are you reading this week?

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Library Lust

credit: Cameron Ruppert (via Desire to Inspire)

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badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Lots of choice this week!  On top of these books, I am steadily working my way through the Amelia Peabody mysteries (after rereading Crocodile on the Sandbank a few weeks ago) so just assume there are always three or four of those being checked out alongside whatever else you see.  I’m on to the 10th book in the series now, which is when things really start to get good, so remembering to alternate the mysteries with other books (as I have been doing) may test my resolve over the next week or two.

Where the Hornbeam Grows by Beth Lynch – I’ve been looking forward to this since hearing about it on the Slightly Foxed podcast last year.  (Book Depository)

The Well-Gardened Mind by Sue Stuart-Smith – a thoughtful look at the powerful ways in which nature and gardening can improve our lives. (Book Depository)

The Garden on Holly Street by Megan Attley – Light, garden-themed fluff. (Book Depository)

Sweet Sorrow by David Nicholls – I loved the Guardian‘s review for this: Sweet Sorrow is a book that does what Nicholls does best, sinking the reader deep into a nostalgic memory-scape, pinning the narrative to a love story that manages to be moving without ever tipping over into sentimentality, all of it composed with deftness, intelligence and, most importantly, humour. (Book Depository)

You Had Me at Hola by Alexis Daria – Billed as perfect for fans of Jane the Virgin, this romcom about telenovella stars looks irresistible.  (Book Depository)

Island Affair by Priscilla Oliveras – NPR included this in their April romance novel round up and it sounded fun. (Book Depository)

To War with the Walkers by Annabel Venning – I love family histories and this one, about six siblings and their experiences of World War Two, looks wonderful and was featured on a number of “Best of 2019” lists. (Book Depository)

Pumpkinheads by Rainbow Rowell, illustrated by Faith Erin Hicks – Sharlene had this in her loot back in January and I thought it looked cute.  I had no idea there would be actual pumpkins in the fields by the time I actually got my hands on it but that’s the way this year has gone!  (Book Depository)

What are you reading this week?

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Library Lust

credit: Harrison Design

I think most people have been longing for larger gardens during covid but this sets the bar even higher: a stunning light- and book-filled garden studio to relax and work in. You can see even more details here (including hidden rooms).

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Library Lust

Bookworm Cabin, Poland

This cabin in the Polish countryside looks idyllic – no TV, no WiFi, just books and the perfect cosy setting.  You can see more photos (and book a stay) here.

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